Manga
Hayate the Combat Butler: Volume 26 manga review
By Leroy Douresseaux
Sep 18, 2015 - 19:17

Viz Media
Writer(s): Kenjiro Hata, John Werry
Penciller(s): Kenjiro Hata
Letterer(s): John Hunt
ISBN: 978-1-4215-7787-6
$9.99 U.S., $12.99 CAN, £6.99 UK, 192pp, B&W, paperback




hayatecombat26.jpg
Hayate the Combat Butler Volume 26 cover image


Rated “T+” for “Older Teen”

Since he was 9-years-old, Hayate Ayasaki had been working to pay off his degenerate parents' gambling debts.  Those same parents sold their son’s organs to the yakuza to cover those debts, and then, disappeared.  Hayate worked various part-time jobs to pay off the debts.  Then, fate brought Hayate to teenage heiress, Nagi Sanzenin a/k/a “Ojô-sama.”  She is the frequent target of kidnapping plots and of various schemes by people trying to get her money.  Hayate becomes Ojô-sama’s butler, zealously protecting her, while she falls in love with him.

As Hayate the Combat Butler, Vol. 26 opens, Yukiji says that she wants a man who can make her heart go “B-DMP!”  Is Kaoru the man who can bring the noise?

A new era begins.  Nagi lost her fortune and is forced to leave the palatial estate that has been her home.  With what is left her of money, Hayate has bought Nagi a new home, Murasaki Mansion, which turns out to have a connection to Nagi's past.  Now, that past rears its feline head.  Nagi has an idea on how to raise more funds – turn her new home into a boarding house.  Also, Nagi, Hayate, and Maria welcome their first tenant, put on a surprise birthday party, and try to move Tama in.

THE LOWDOWN:  If you, dear reader, regularly sample my missives on manga, then, you know that I love the Hayate the Combat Butler manga.  Yeah, I'm still a Hayate ride-or-die chick, and I still feel myself surrendering to Hayate the Combat Butler's many charms.  I am still falling into Hayate Ayasaki's capable butler arms...

Seriously, Hayate the Combat Butler Volume 26 sees the series move into a new era, but the wacky hijinks continue.  Murasaki Mansion and the disinheritance simply provide new situations for the same old comedy played out in different ways.  In fact, Vol. 26 is a good jump-on point for new readers, as most of the chapters contained herein are fairly self-explanatory.

POSSIBLE AUDIENCE:  Readers looking for comedy about manga and anime can find laughs in the Shonen Sunday manga, Hayate the Combat Butler.







Rating: A/10

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